Christian existentialism – Will To Exist http://willtoexist.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 02:00:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://willtoexist.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-6-120x120.png Christian existentialism – Will To Exist http://willtoexist.com/ 32 32 Parents denounce the “sick” Satan Club for children as young as 5 https://willtoexist.com/parents-denounce-the-sick-satan-club-for-children-as-young-as-5/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 17:28:00 +0000 https://willtoexist.com/parents-denounce-the-sick-satan-club-for-children-as-young-as-5/ The School system go to hell. A California elementary school is facing backlash from parents after promoting an After School Satan Club for children as young as 5. The controversial club is set to hold monthly meetings beginning in December at Golden Hills Elementary School in Tehachapi, Bakersfield Now reported. It was created by the […]]]>


The School system go to hell.

A California elementary school is facing backlash from parents after promoting an After School Satan Club for children as young as 5.

The controversial club is set to hold monthly meetings beginning in December at Golden Hills Elementary School in Tehachapi, Bakersfield Now reported. It was created by the non-theistic religious organization Satanic Temple – not to be confused with the Church of Satan – as an antidote to evangelical Christian groups springing up in public schools.

“The Satanic Temple does not advocate religion in schools,” said the Outfit states on its website. “However, once religion invades the schools, as the Good News Clubs have done, the Satanic Temple will fight to ensure respect for plurality and true religious freedom.”

In this case, the After School Satan Club was created in response to the Good News Club – a weekly Christian program for children ages 5-12 — runs after-school programs at Golden Hills Elementary.

Needless to say, the parents were unhappy with the development, which many deemed “disgusting” and sacrilegious.

“I think it’s disgusting, I understand that the school has to allow them because they allow other after school programs such as the good news, which is a Christianity based after school program, that one I’m with I agree, but I can’t imagine why anyone would want their child to hang out with this satanic group,” Sheila Knight, grandparent of a fifth-grader in Golden Hills, told Bakersfield Now.

The group was created by the non-theistic religious organization Satanic Temple — not to be confused with the Church of Satan — as an antidote to evangelical Christian groups springing up in public schools.
The satanic temple

“Tehachapi said yes, and I think they made a mistake,” said Brenda Maher, grandparent of a first-grader. “I know my grandson will not be part of this club.”

However, organizers of the After School Satan Club believe the criticism is misplaced because the group does not actually promote Satanism, but rather encourages critical thinking and rationalism, according to the site.

“The initial reaction is definitely one of shock and disgust,” Lauren Mae, a mother from Tehachapi who volunteers with the After School Satan Club, says SFGATE in an email. “They really seem to think we’re devil worshippers, which we’re not. We do not believe in a supernatural Satan.

Paul Hicks, a critical-minded teacher who will lead the club, backed up that sentiment. “I’m not teaching these kids to be satanic, I’m not teaching these kids that they have to salute Satan or identify themselves as Satanists,” he said. “What we do is we think critically, we teach science, we teach empathy and caring.”

Some parents are unhappy with the group, calling it "repugnant" and one "mistake."
Some parents are unhappy with the band, calling it “disgusting” and a “mistake”.
Google Maps

He added: “There is currently a Good News Club there which teaches children to go save souls for Jesus, at school. We want to give another point of view.

However, many parents simply viewed the move as a philosophical Trojan horse aimed at promoting devil worship in schools.

“’So, I’ve had several people tell me that the new Golden Hills Elementary Satan Club after school is not a religion, but a philosophy club…So why did they choose Satan?’ asked concerned citizen Joe Lathrop in the Facebook group “Tehachapi Ask, Raves and Rants”. “Why not the Jean Paul Satre Existentialism Club? Why not the Descartes club?

He added, “They put Satan in the name for a reason. People should stop being intellectually dishonest and just admit that they want children to worship Satan as a secular god.

However, the Tehachapi Unified School District said in a statement that the law prevents them from discriminating against organizations that want to use school grounds based on philosophy, according to Bakersfield Now.

Additionally, parents must give permission before their children can attend meetings, according to a Satanic Temple flyer. “No one should get involved if they don’t want to, and children will need to have signed releases from their parents to get involved at all,” said After School spokesperson and co-founder Lucien Greaves. Satan Club. .

This isn’t the first time the Satanic Temple Club has ruffled the feathers of academia. In April, an elementary school in Pennsylvania rejected a similar proposal to create an After School Satan Club on campus.

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Drishyam 2 Ending Explained: Ajay Devgn’s Remake Takes A Different Twist From Mohanlal’s Thriller – Here’s How! (SPOILER ALERT) https://willtoexist.com/drishyam-2-ending-explained-ajay-devgns-remake-takes-a-different-twist-from-mohanlals-thriller-heres-how-spoiler-alert/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 15:33:41 +0000 https://willtoexist.com/drishyam-2-ending-explained-ajay-devgns-remake-takes-a-different-twist-from-mohanlals-thriller-heres-how-spoiler-alert/ At first glance, Ajay Devgn Drishyam 2just like its predecessor, is fairly faithful to Mohanlal-Jeethu Joseph’s Malayalam thriller Drishyam 2. There are some interesting tweaks here, and before I go on to expand on them, let me warn you that this article contains MAJOR SPOILERS, so please be careful. So yes, there are some interesting […]]]>

At first glance, Ajay Devgn Drishyam 2just like its predecessor, is fairly faithful to Mohanlal-Jeethu Joseph’s Malayalam thriller Drishyam 2. There are some interesting tweaks here, and before I go on to expand on them, let me warn you that this article contains MAJOR SPOILERS, so please be careful. So yes, there are some interesting tweaks, like bringing back Kamlesh Sawant’s vengeful cop Gaitonde from the first film – something the Malayalam film eschews – and having the remake’s cops take more “unconstitutional” ways to trouble the protagonist and his poor family. Drishyam 2 movie review: Ajay Devgn’s Vijay Salgaonkar returns in this flimsy Mohanlal-Starrer remake.

That said, Devgn’s Salgaonkar still has a few tricks up his sleeve to save his family once again, despite the nearly impossible trap his returning nemesis Meera (Tabu), new assistant IG Tarun (Akshaye Khanna) and Gaitonde stand ready for. him. The same tricks we’ve seen Georgekutty return to the court system to save his family in his Drishyam 2. The only difference is that their high-risk plan has different effects on the two unseemly heroes. Before we dive into what makes them different, let’s first explain how Vijay manages to save his family first.

Salgaonkar’s Impossible Plan (That Worked)

So Vijay knew that his perfect crime in the last movie wasn’t so perfect, and there’s bound to be some sort of repercussion for him. Which, as he predicted, happened when an eyewitness saw him on the night of October 3 after burying the body. Also, Meera and Tarun had placed some spies on him and his family, and due to Nandini’s troubled state of mind, they get a hidden recording of a near-confession from her. To save his family, Vijay takes all the blame for killing Meera’s son Sam and burying his body at the police station.

A picture of Drishyam 2

But Meera and Tarun fail to calculate Vijay’s brilliant foresight. He had already planned this moment for years, in fact from the very minute he was first acquitted of Sam’s murder. He first searched for the body of a Christian person who had died of a head in the newspaper obituaries and who is the same age as Sam. When he finally finds such a body, he befriends the gravedigger where the body is cremated and bribes him nicely, until the latter digs up the bones of the deceased, which Vijay hides in a bag and places it under the floor of his multiplex office.

Next comes the most interesting part of his plan. Vijay approaches acclaimed screenwriter Murad Ali (Saurabh Shukla) to produce a film based on his screenplay. The first half of the storyline is similar to the events of the first film, but with different characters, settings, and names. The second half is what Vijay assumes would happen to him when the police recover the body, leading to a sad ending where his character in the film is arrested. Plus, he turns his screenplay into a novel (unsurprisingly called Drishyam) and publishes it under the guise of copyright protection.

So, Vijay’s confession to the cops became moot, when his lawyer presents the argument that the cops coerced the confession using the same story as the novel, which was published with Murad Ali as the author! And when the DNA test revealed that the remains are not of Sam, there was nothing for the court to convict Vijay of any wrongdoing, he again managed to fire a quick shot at the cops.

But how would Vijay know when to swap Sam’s remains with the ones he had hidden in his office? Under the guise that he doesn’t want a sad ending for his film, Vijay uses Murad’s connection to figure out in such a situation, where the police would send the mortal remains for forensics and DNA testing. Murad informs her that in such a case, the mortal remains would be sent to the local medical school first. Based on this information, Vijay befriends the medical school morgue security guard with the lure of drinks and the promise to cast him in a movie.

A picture of Drishyam 2

The unconscious person, who frequently does night shifts, often invites Vijay to his office to sleep there after a heavy drinking session. So Vijay has all the chess players and his board ready, and he’s just waiting for the right moment. Through the CCTV installed in his cable TV office near the police station, Vijay finds out about the police discovery of the skeletal remains. He puts the plan into action, and once again, using a drinking session as an excuse, Vijay gains access to the morgue (which has no CCTV cameras) to swap the bones. The rest is just stunning!

As for where he managed to find the money to pay for all his efforts, we are told at the beginning that he had sold his property, which unbeknownst to him, was in Meera herself. So basically he used Meera’s money to foil his plans!

Vijay vs. George Kutty

In this section I will tell you why Vijay is made of different material than Georgekutty. Although both are ordinary men with extraordinary foresight and feel guilty for what Meera and her husband are going through (which is why they send some of the murdered boy’s bones for ritual purposes to his parents) , there is always a clear difference. between the two.

A still image of Drishyam 2 (Malayalam)

Murad Ali mentions to Tarun and Meera that he thought the movie’s new ending (which, in reality, is Vijay’s real plan) was risky and implausible. A similar scene takes place in the Malayalam film, but it also allows the film to develop Georgekutty’s guilt and awareness that he knew his plan was fraught with risk. Georgekutty is a movie lover and he believes that, like movie heroes, luck would favor him despite the fact that there is every chance his plan will fail. When the screenwriter points out that what the protagonist of their film does is still a crime, Georgekutty solemnly tells him that leading a life of looking over your shoulder for fear of being caught is already man’s greatest punishment. Drishyam 2 movie review: Mohanlal’s sequel to his hit family thriller is loaded with luscious surprises.

This feeling is repeated in the final scene. IGP Thomas Bastin (Murali Gopy) tells Geeta and her husband (Asha Sharath and Siddique) after completing their son’s last rites, that if they thought they were the ones spying on Georgekutty, in reality it was the reverse. Georgekutty was already two steps ahead of them, and besides, he could still observe them and already plan his next move. As Thomas continues to speak off-screen, we see that Georgekutty is already doing what he just said.

A still image of Drishyam 2 (Malayalam)

But Thomas tells Geeta that it’s time to drop his revenge, since Georgekutty is already punished by the fact that he will have to be too careful and on his guard for the rest of his life. At this point, the Malayalam film ends. It was a subtle way to bring the Georgekutty saga to a close, revealing a troubled future to him while keeping the door ajar for a possible sequel in the future. Drishyam 2 Ending Explained: Will Mohanlal’s Georgekutty Return For A Threequel? To find!

What does the Hindi remake do? The final scene avoids Tarun, and it’s Meera’s husband who tells her that Vijay is keeping tabs on them and planning his next move (which he does), but the movie never mentions the hellish existentialism that does. undergo in Vijay.

A picture of Drishyam 2

In fact, the remake puts an extra scene where Vijay meets his family and drives off in his car with them. We hear his mental monologue going all Dom Toretto, saying he would do anything to protect his family and for which he will go all the way. This ending is more macho in feel compared to the Malayalam movie, and more confident going into a sequel.

Both Drishyam 2s opt for happy endings, but the Malayalam film ends with a sense of melancholy and introspection while the Hindi remake has its hero more confident and daring than before. So which ending do you prefer? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

PS: Hindi Drishyam 2 the remake conveniently omits Gaitonde, though it considers him a despicable enemy and also smugly confronts him with Vijay before taking him to court.

(The story above first appeared on LatestLY on November 18, 2022 at 9:03 PM IST. For more news and updates on politics, world, sports, entertainment and lifestyle , log in to our website lately.com).

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Annie Ernaux transforms memory into art https://willtoexist.com/annie-ernaux-transforms-memory-into-art/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 11:00:26 +0000 https://willtoexist.com/annie-ernaux-transforms-memory-into-art/ People don’t tend to film their arguments and fights. Ernaux has alluded to her husband’s banter, but, true to form, she’s inclined to view their split as both a public and private phenomenon. “All around them, divorce proliferated,” Ernaux writes, in “The Years,” referring to his cohort of women who had grown up being told […]]]>

People don’t tend to film their arguments and fights. Ernaux has alluded to her husband’s banter, but, true to form, she’s inclined to view their split as both a public and private phenomenon. “All around them, divorce proliferated,” Ernaux writes, in “The Years,” referring to his cohort of women who had grown up being told that premarital sex was a sin, and pregnancy out of wedlock a disaster, only to see the next generation met with “unanimous approval” when they ducked the altar. In 1981, Ernaux published his third novel, “A frozen woman», the story of a young wife and mother who ends up feeling suffocated by the constraints of domestic life. This is when family videos end. Ernaux had left the marriage for good.

Now Ernaux has become hers. She published the books about her father and her mother. She had an audience, a name. Then, in 1991, came “Simple Passion,” and everything readers thought they knew about this cerebral, sober woman went out the window. “Since last September, I have done nothing but wait for a man: for him to call me and come to my house,” Ernaux writes at the start. The sixty short pages that follow constitute a story of voluntary captivity. During the months of her liaison with A., as she calls her lover, Ernaux leans towards him like a flower towards the sun. She stays home when she should be out; she doesn’t use the vacuum cleaner for fear of drowning out the ringtone. A. is a foreigner, an Eastern European; her weakness for Western luxury reminds Ernaux that she was a teenager”reached, ” envy of the dresses and the holidays that his richest friends had. A. shares none of his intellectual interests, but so what? She herself can only listen to love songs.

After A. returns home, Ernaux becomes morbid. If he gave her AIDS, she thinks, “at least he would have left me this.” And yet, in this sex-saturated book, there isn’t much sex. Ernaux is at her most graphic in the preface, where she describes watching an X-rated movie on TV, stunned by its factual depiction of what for centuries had been taboo. Writing, she thinks, should try to achieve the same effect: “a feeling of anxiety and bewilderment, a suspension of moral judgment”.

“Simple Passion” was a major bestseller, and no surprise; if you have experienced the kind of agony described by Ernaux, you will not find a more distilled description. Some readers, however, felt betrayed. When Ernaux was asked to lecture at Wellesley, the students attacked her for her submission. Didn’t she claim to be a feminist? Yes, and that’s what made “Simple Passion” so powerful and terrifying. Ernaux had succeeded in conveying the force with which desire can make the rest of life – the rest of oneself – instantly empty. She was not advocating that women lose their minds to a man. She was describing what it feels like when that happens, like you might describe a tornado that leveled your house.

A decade later, Ernaux does something surprising and publishes excerpts from the diary she kept during the case. This book, “To get lostwas released in the United States in September, in a translation by Alison L. Strayer. Here is finally the sex that Ernaux had above all elided in “Simple Passion” – the positions, the fluids – and the torture of waiting, unfolded in all its misery in real time. “My whole life has been an effort to tear myself away from male desire, that is to say from my own desire,” confesses Ernaux. (Perhaps the Wellesley students were right.) As a rule, Ernaux is not a funny writer, but the friction between her finely developed mind and the tyrannical demands of her body produces moments of genuine comedy. When she loses a contact lens and finds it on her lover’s penis, her first thought goes to Zola, “who has lost his monocle between women’s breasts”. Then there’s the chasm between her devotion to her lover – “addiction” might be the best word – and her awareness of his obvious mediocrity. Now called by his real initial, S., he turns out to be a thirty-five-year-old Soviet apparatchik whom Ernaux, forty-eight, met during a writer’s trip to the USSR. “, she records. “And yet, it all boils down to this: he fucks, he drinks vodka, he talks about Stalin.”

Here Ernaux risks indulgence. “The Years,” which covers the period from 1941 to 2006 and is practically cosmic in tone and scope, covers well over two hundred pages, but “Getting Lost” is somewhat longer. What prompted her to publish? In the period after the affair, she told me, “A very jealous lover forbade me to read the newspaper. She agreed to seal it in an envelope, where it remained until their breakup six years later. “Then I read it, and I discovered that it had a fabulous unity. But it was not at all the same as “Simple Passion”. It was another text. And I was also another woman. I felt like I was reading a novel. It was the writing itself that worked on me, as if I didn’t know what was coming next! It was the ecstatic abandonment not of the lover but of the reader. Ernaux was transfixed by a fictional character, who happened to be herself.

This notion of becoming another woman – of oneself transfigured by time – animates all of Ernaux’s work. As she says in “Shame,” writing about her missing, younger self is one of only two ways she knows “to bring the two of us together.” (The other, orgasm, “the moment when my sense of identity and coherence is at its peak,” is, of course, more fleeting.) But, she explains in “Simple Passion,” the time passing can also be a comfort, even a creative necessity:

Of course, I feel no shame in writing these things because of the time between when they are written – when only I can see them – and when they will be read by other people, when I sense that he will never come. At that time, I could have had an accident or died; a war or a revolution could have broken out. This delay allows me to write today, in the same way that I lay under the scorching sun for a whole day at sixteen, or made love without contraceptives at twenty: without thinking of the consequences.

Ernaux sometimes ends her books with the dates of their composition, as if to link them to this precious period when she lived alone with them. “Happening”, published in 2000, was written between February and October 1999, thirty-six years after the events it relates. “I had the feeling that I was writing out of time,” Ernaux told me. Abortion had been legal in France since 1975. People took it for granted; no one seemed interested in commemorating the struggle, led by Simone Veil, to legalize it, or remembering the horrors that women had faced before. “There is a parade every July 14,” Ernaux said. “We celebrate that; we are not supposed to forget. But if it concerns women? It’s all over, no one needs to talk about it. I had the feeling that I was going to die one day and that there would be no trace of it. I wouldn’t have been able to convey everything I needed.

What Ernaux needed to convey, in this brutal and indelible book, was what it had been like to have an abortion in the fall of 1963 and the winter of 1964, when anyone performing an abortion, or seeking one, or encouraged it, or even advocated for the use of contraception, could be fined and sent to prison. Ernaux was studying in Rouen when she discovered she was pregnant. “Somehow I felt there was a connection between my social background and my current condition,” she writes. So much for his whimsical upbringing: “My ass had caught up with me, and the thing that was growing inside me, I saw as the stigma of social failure.” Even so, she thought getting an abortion would be easy. She had read about abortions in novels; she had heard women from Yvetot talking about it in low tones. She knew it would be painful. She had no idea she could die.

She learnt. Although Happening is written with Ernaux’s usual piercing clarity, the book seems to unfold in a sort of suffocating twilight as the avenues pursued by twenty-three-year-old Annie close one by one. A friend in whom she confides invites her to dinner with his wife and child and then tries to seduce her. Doctors refuse to help. Annie desperately tries to find a friend of a friend who is rumored to know an abortionist. She is supposed to work on her thesis, on surreal women, but she can only focus on her own feminine reality. “In a strange way, my inability to write my thesis was far more alarming than my need to abort,” writes Ernaux. “I had ceased to be ‘an intellectual’. I don’t know if this feeling is widespread. This causes indescribable pain. Another type of pain follows an unsuccessful attempt to solve one’s problem with a pair of knitting needles. All the while she feels “time is flowing inside and outside of me” – the common timeline is moving forward, her private timeline is moving backward.

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‘Next Exit’ Movie Review: Mali Elfman Directs Afterlife Movie Road Trip https://willtoexist.com/next-exit-movie-review-mali-elfman-directs-afterlife-movie-road-trip/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 19:30:00 +0000 https://willtoexist.com/next-exit-movie-review-mali-elfman-directs-afterlife-movie-road-trip/ Despite taking big metaphysical leaps with its premise, Mali Elfman’s double is ultimately a retread of standard indie movie beats. One of the great ironies of human existence is that death, the very thing we spend our lives trying to avoid, is the source of much of life’s meaning. This is one of the points […]]]>

Despite taking big metaphysical leaps with its premise, Mali Elfman’s double is ultimately a retread of standard indie movie beats.

One of the great ironies of human existence is that death, the very thing we spend our lives trying to avoid, is the source of much of life’s meaning. This is one of the points made by Jean-Paul Sartre in “No Exit”, his landmark piece which follows three deceased humans whose eternal punishment is to be locked in a room and forced to make small talk forever. Our most precious moments are precious because they eventually expire – do anything long enough and it eventually becomes a chore.

As one would expect from its title, “Next exitconstantly riffs on Sartre’s dramatic existentialism and shares his interest in what happens when humans are confined together. Mali Elfmantakes place in a world where scientists have definitively proven that ghosts are real, with indisputable video evidence showing that we can come back to haunt the people we love (and hate) after we die. This news freed many people from their fear of death, but it also catalyzed a sea change in everyone’s priorities. Robberies have dropped to almost zero (holding someone at gunpoint just isn’t as compelling as it used to be), and news of a suicide is barely more notable than the latest baseball score .

The scientist who discovered this phenomenon (Karen Gillan) now runs Life Beyond, a popular assisted suicide program that meticulously ensures that its subjects can return as ghosts. He attracts Rose (Katie Parker) and Teddy (Rahul Kohli), two strangers with a death wish who find themselves accepted as research subjects. She is completely bored with human existence and ready to die, as he pursues the glory of participating in such an important chapter of humanity’s exploration of the universe. The only thing that separates them from death is a drive across the country to San Francisco.

It’s fascinating to imagine how human society would adapt to the news that life is no longer over, but Elfman’s film never quite lives up to the brilliance of its premise. Parker and Kohli both give great performances, but the majority of “Next Exit” is hard to distinguish from the standard road trip dramas that appear at Sundance every year.

Rose and Teddy meet at a rental car lot, where they both try to retrieve the vehicles Life Beyond was supposed to provide them. But even in a world where ghosts exist, the idea of ​​an efficient car rental company is just too far-fetched to be real. A logistical snafu forces them to share a car on their last road trip.

Despite (or perhaps because of) the fact that they’re both about to die, the reluctant carpoolers immediately start getting upset. She just wants to get it over with, but he tries his best to enjoy the ride. Despite her irritation with her constant banter, they slowly begin to bond over a few long nights of drinking. Love is soon in the air, and the road to their own deathbed starts to feel a little less urgent. They find time to check out some fun bucket list items, and they help each other take on the family members who made them want to die in the first place. Despite fluctuating between life’s highs and lows, the journey makes a pretty compelling argument that what we have on this planet is better than being a ghost.

It’s never quite clear why Rose and Teddy despise each other at first, and their unrealistic banter leaves little mystery as to how they’ll feel about each other after their cross-country trip. And while Elfman does an extremely competent job of demonstrating how trauma has shaped their lives, both of their responses to that trauma seem better suited to our world than the one in the film. As the story unfolds, it becomes increasingly difficult to believe that these two characters are so focused on the events of their childhoods instead of, you know, the news that God is real.

This missed opportunity is what ultimately separates “Next Exit” from the best films about the pros and cons of life. From “It’s a Wonderful Life” to “Harold and Maude,” movie history is filled with death-obsessed protagonists who ultimately choose to live on. But in these films, the choice is between existence and non-existence, with the characters ultimately deciding that something beautiful but imperfect is better than nothing.

The evidence of an afterlife that Rose and Teddy are blessed (or cursed) with complicates matters for them, but the film’s worldview largely ignores that fantasy in favor of a lesson applicable to our world. In “No Exit”, Sartre presents Hell as an eternity spent with others. In “Next Exit”, human relationships can be heaven because we don’t have an eternity.

Category B-

Magnolia Pictures will release “Next Exit” in theaters and on VOD on Friday, November 4.

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Kierkegaard on Why We All Misunderstand Love’s True Meaning: An Animated Explanation https://willtoexist.com/kierkegaard-on-why-we-all-misunderstand-loves-true-meaning-an-animated-explanation/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 11:03:01 +0000 https://willtoexist.com/kierkegaard-on-why-we-all-misunderstand-loves-true-meaning-an-animated-explanation/ Soren Kierkegaard died in 1855, but if he had glimpsed our modern landscape of dating apps, he probably would have understood it. “People who otherwise pride themselves on being unbiased will apply terribly strict criteria to their choice of mate,” says Alain de Botton in the School of Life animated video above. “They want someone […]]]>

Soren Kierkegaard died in 1855, but if he had glimpsed our modern landscape of dating apps, he probably would have understood it. “People who otherwise pride themselves on being unbiased will apply terribly strict criteria to their choice of mate,” says Alain de Botton in the School of Life animated video above. “They want someone with just a certain type of face or income or sense of humor. They see themselves as kind and tolerant, but when it comes to love, they have all the breadth of mind of a follower of a “caste system in which men are inhumanly separated by the distinctions of earthly life”.

Kierkegaard noticed these human tendencies even in his time, and in his opinion they had nothing to do with love – true Christian love, that is, he spent a good part of his philosophical career to try to elucidate. He insisted, de Botton explains, “that most of us have no idea what love is, even though we keep referring to that term.”

Whether in Europe in the 19th century or almost anywhere in the world today, we believe in romantic love, which involves “the reverence and adoration of a very special person with whose soul and body we hope to unite ours”. But this, according to Kierkegaard, results in “a narrow, impoverished sense of the love that should actually be”.

The version of Christian love advocated by Kierkegaard “commands us to love everyone, beginning, most harshly, with all those whom we instinctively consider unworthy of love.” In this view, those whom we believe to be “cheated, ugly, irritating, venal, misguided or ridiculous” are exactly the people to whom we must “extend our compassion”, identify and understand the difficulties that have made them what they are. are and offering our kindness and forgiveness accordingly. The ultimate goal, according to Kierkegaard, is “to love everyone without exception,” which may well seem like an unreasonable demand. But how less reasonable is that than the checklists that so many of us screen our potential matches with?

To go deeper, read Kierkegaard’s book, works of love.

Related Content:

An animated Monty Python-style introduction to Søren Kierkegaard, the first existentialist

Søren Kierkegaard: a free online course on the “father of existentialism”

The existential philosophy of Kierkegaard, Sartre, Camus explained with 8-bit video games

What is love? BBC philosophy animations feature Sartre, Freud, Aristophanes, Dawkins and more

Dear Immanuel – Kant gives loving advice to a broken-hearted young woman (1791)

Coffee drinking philosophers: the excessive habits of Kant, Voltaire and Kierkegaard

Based in Seoul, Colin Marshall writes and distributests about cities, language and culture. His projects include the Substack newsletter books about cities, the book The Stateless City: A Walk Through 21st Century Los Angeles and the video series The city in cinema. Follow him on Twitter at @colinmarshall Or on Facebook.

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Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris (2022) Is So Sweet It’ll Give You a Toothache https://willtoexist.com/mrs-harris-goes-to-paris-2022-is-so-sweet-itll-give-you-a-toothache/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 21:43:00 +0000 https://willtoexist.com/mrs-harris-goes-to-paris-2022-is-so-sweet-itll-give-you-a-toothache/ When she arrives in Paris, cash in hand, Ms. Harris is a smash hit with everyone from tramps stopped at a train station to staff at Maison Christian Dior. His only failure is with the manager, Madame Colbert (Isabelle Huppert – who knows how to play the snob). But we can be sure that even […]]]>

When she arrives in Paris, cash in hand, Ms. Harris is a smash hit with everyone from tramps stopped at a train station to staff at Maison Christian Dior. His only failure is with the manager, Madame Colbert (Isabelle Huppert – who knows how to play the snob). But we can be sure that even his tremendous arrogance is destined to crumble.

Superstar Charlady strikes up warm friendships with a kind-hearted model named Natasha (Alba Baptista), a handsome accountant, André Fauvel (Lucas Bravo), and a dashing Marquis (Lambert Wilson). It’s as if the French had never met a cockney cleaning lady and were completely disarmed by this new phenomenon. The big questions are, “Will she get her dress?” And if so, “What’s she going to do with it?”

I won’t reveal the plot any further. Suffice to say that the whole film is so sweet that I wanted to brush my teeth when it was over. In this fable, Mrs. Harris is not only Cinderella, hoping to buy the dress that will turn her into a princess, but also the fairy godmother, determined to create a romance between Natasha and André. She even has a touch of Rosa Luxemburg, helping workers claim their rights at Maison Dior.

The Caracas dress from the Christian Dior fashion show in “Mrs. Harris goes to Paris”. Ada Movies

Paul Gallico was an American who looked at salt-of-the-earth Londoners like Mrs. Harris through the eyes of an outsider. The character is a benign composite of all the virtues of working-class England and none of the vices. The portrayal of the French is even further removed from reality, being a ruthless but affectionate caricature. If everyone in the French fashion industry were as nice as these people, there would never have been an industry at all. The only villainous specimen is a certain Madame Avallon who despises Mrs. Harris (but will no doubt pay for her class conscience).

Yes, it’s all good, cleanly fun, wrapped in an intrusive musical score that constantly lets us know when it’s time to be thrilled by the sheer magic of it all. The recurring theme of the dialogue is the need to cling to one’s dreams. Apparently, what’s special about Mrs. Harris is that she has dreams and she clings to them. This is presented as a supreme moral virtue.

Ms Harris may be a little more awake than her fictional 1958 counterpart, but she still has no bigger ‘dream’ than to own a £500 dress. Like so many lucky working-class types, she thinks owning expensive goods confers class and sophistication (cf. Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin…). But because Ms. Harris is so holy in every way, we have to forgive her for this materialistic fixation, and maybe forgive the entire fashion industry in the process. After all, what do fashion designers sell if not dreams?

It is hoped that the filmmakers have been generously helped by Dior, as the film is a long advertisement for the firm, presented as the epitome of French elegance. No other designer even gets a mention.

While it’s hard to get too excited about Mrs. Harris and her adventures in Paris, this tale is still a big step up from the George Clooney-Julia Roberts vehicle. ticket to paradise, who, as an imperialist, saw the Balinese as exotic and childish natives. In Fabian’s film, it’s the French who are the naive ones and the children, who need Mrs. Harris’ common sense to put them on the right track. After all, you can’t go that far with Jean-Paul Sartre and Jean-Luc Godard.

Mrs. Harris goes to Paris

Realized by Antoine Fabien

Written by Carroll Cartwright, Anthony Fabian, Keith Thompson, Olivia Hetreed, based on a novel by Paul Gallico

Featuring Lesley Manville, Isabelle Huppert, Lambert Wilson, Alba Baptista, Lucas Bravo, Ellen Thomas, Jason Isaacs, Rose Williams, Anna Chancellor, Philippe Bertin

UK/Canada/France/USA/Hungary/Belgium, PG rated, 115 mins

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Mrs. Harris goes to Paris https://willtoexist.com/mrs-harris-goes-to-paris/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 22:22:58 +0000 https://willtoexist.com/mrs-harris-goes-to-paris/ There’s more than meets the eye in Anthony Fabian’s Cinderella-like adaptation of Paul Gallico’s 1958 novel Mrs. ‘Arris goes to Paristhough the transformative power of a stunningly beautiful dress, and its ability to make the once invisible one visible to the world, remains the heart of the film. Ada Harris (Lesley Manville re-enters the world […]]]>

There’s more than meets the eye in Anthony Fabian’s Cinderella-like adaptation of Paul Gallico’s 1958 novel Mrs. ‘Arris goes to Paristhough the transformative power of a stunningly beautiful dress, and its ability to make the once invisible one visible to the world, remains the heart of the film.

Ada Harris (Lesley Manville re-enters the world of mid-century high fashion but in a very different role from her frosty Cyril Woodcock in ghost yarn) is a good-natured housekeeper from Battersea. It’s 1957 and she’s just been told she’s been officially widowed by the War Department after her husband disappeared over ten years ago. Completely reliable, she cleans for a variety of clients, some of whom like the obnoxious Lady Dant (Anna Chancellor) are happy to exploit her labor but not so happy when she asks for her salary. Lady Dant spent £500 on a dazzling Christian Dior dress which Ada treats with reverent longing, inspiring her to one day go to Paris and buy such a marvel for herself.

Ada’s life in London isn’t filled with drudgery; she has her friends Vi (Ellen Thomas) and the cheeky bookmaker, Archie (an excellent performance by Jason Isaacs) to keep her company in the local pub, but she feels her life is on hold for a long time as she hopefully waits -the return of her husband Eddie. She has reached middle age and no one really sees her – a state of anonymity that many women face after crossing the threshold of 50. A small series of good fortune; including a win in the Football Pools, a reward for turning in a diamond clip to the police, and a round win at the local dog races, and an unexpected pension from War Widow, means she can finally do something right to. She books an overnight trip to Paris and visits Dior’s famous atelier at 30 Avenue Montaigne.

Having no real idea how fashion houses work, Ada finds that she is initially barred from entering Dior’s 10th anniversary presentation of her collection. She comes up against the Cyril Woodcock of the film, the severe Madame Colbert by Isabelle Huppert. Despite Ada’s protests and presenting her roll of notes to Madame Colbert, claiming that she “saved every penny she earned” to buy a dress, class barriers rule her out. She is rescued by a young accountant, André Fauvel (Lucas Bravo), and is escorted into the show by the widower the Marquis de Chassange (Lambert Wilson). A fairy tale indeed, but one that the public wants for Ada.

The showcase of Dior’s “New Look” dresses and suits (designed by multi-award-winning designer Jenny Beavan) has Ada gasping with delight – seeing such exquisite work within her reach is almost overwhelming. Her first desire is to buy a stunning dark red tea dress called “Temptation”, but when a particularly mean-spirited customer claims it for herself, Ada chooses a marvelous green dress called “Venus”. What Ada doesn’t understand is that designer dresses aren’t something you can just pick and pay for; there’s a long process of adjustments and customizations and the soonest she can hope to take delivery of ‘Venus’ is a fortnight.

Thanks to André’s kindness, she was offered accommodation in Paris. She also quickly bonded with the current “face of Dior” – Sartre reading Natasha (Alba Baptista) and the two form a friendship that extends to André (who passionately discusses existentialism with Natasha). A conversation at a dinner party becomes philosophical when each character reveals that they are, by Sartre’s definition, only appearing as one thing. Ada is more than a cleaner, André is more than an accountant, and Natasha is definitely more than an exposed model.

Ada’s stay in Paris teaches her the value of having a dream, whether that dream is simply to own a beautiful dress – a scene in the workshop showing how the clothes are put together is filmed as a daydream by the director of the photography Felix Wiedemann. Ada exclaims “It’s not couture, it’s moonlight! Am I in heaven? Ada manages to charm most of the Dior employees, including the picky and temperamental head of couture Monsieur Carré (Bertrand Poncet). The Dior house is in financial difficulty; the exclusivity of haute couture has led them to near bankruptcy and the company begins to lay off staff. Ada, a fervent working-class woman who understands that her class supports the elite, puts the workers on strike until André is able to explain a possible solution to Dior’s monetary problems by opening the label to a tiered system which means ordinary people can buy the Marque Dior.

Ada’s character could be considered a bit exhausting if it weren’t for Lesley Manville’s exceptionally nuanced performance. When a possible romance turns out to be something else, audiences can feel their palpable weariness with how it’s been downplayed. His adventures in Paris are wonderfully captured, and his wonder for the City of Light is reflected in how some Parisians come to love his unassuming goodwill towards others.

Mrs. Harris goes to Paris can be considered a harmless and charming drama/comedy, but there is a strong message about looking beyond stereotypes to find the person behind them. Sartre wrote of making “The Invisible Visible” in “Being and Nothingness” – and as much as Gallico’s novel and Fabian’s film owe Charles Perrault’s classic “Cinderella” fairy tale, it must also to contemporary Gallic philosophical discourse and class. awareness. Ada is a fairy godmother, she is also Cinderella, but above all, she learns the value of self-determination.

The ending may feel stale and rushed, but it’s a minor flaw in an otherwise enchanting adventure about an ordinary woman who was always humble, extraordinary in her own way, she just didn’t manage to see it until a bit of magic; mostly of his own making, came into his life. The third act has a lot going for it, and the arc in which it ties it all together is a little too silky.

However, Mrs. Harris goes to Paris is a jewel that shines like the trimmings of a dress. The film avoids denigrating any of its main characters. People are more than their class or their job – they are the sum of their imaginations. The lessons in Mrs. Harris goes to Paris are never didactic but deserve attention. Never stop hoping; be ready to embrace something new; reward hard work; and finally find a moment to express what makes you special – it’s never too late to discover something transcendent in the world.

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Review: 1975 Exceeds Expectations on “Being Funny in a Foreign Language” https://willtoexist.com/review-1975-exceeds-expectations-on-being-funny-in-a-foreign-language/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 03:41:48 +0000 https://willtoexist.com/review-1975-exceeds-expectations-on-being-funny-in-a-foreign-language/ Photo courtesy Dirty Hit By Andrea Plascencia 10/18/22 10:36 p.m. Rating: ★★★★ Best track: “About you” Longtime fans know the drill: Previous posts are deleted and/or archived, and their Instagram goes blank — for a little while, at least. And then, on June 1 (coincidentally, the band’s birthday), a photo popped up on their social […]]]>

Photo courtesy Dirty Hit

By
Andrea Plascencia

10/18/22 10:36 p.m.

Rating: ★★★★

Best track: “About you”

Longtime fans know the drill: Previous posts are deleted and/or archived, and their Instagram goes blank — for a little while, at least. And then, on June 1 (coincidentally, the band’s birthday), a photo popped up on their social media accounts and there they were – our favorite British men (no, not the Beatles). It’s a new era for our old friends: The 1975.



Nearly two years after their 2020 release, “Notes on a Conditional Form,” the band are back and at their best (or so they say – they named their tour “The 1975 At Their Very Best”) with their highly anticipated fifth studio album, “Being Funny In a Foreign Language”. Released on October 14, the album is a sigh of relief for fans who love their 2013 self-titled debut a little too much (me) and found “Notes” slightly disappointing (me, too).

“Being Funny in A Foreign Language”, consisting of 11 tracks, navigates themes such as post-modernism (because it wouldn’t be The 1975 if it weren’t for post-modernism), falling in love, school shootings, self-reflection and empathy. The album, while short, is cohesive and reminiscent of older albums – with plenty of Easter eggs strewn throughout for fans to enjoy and potentially cry over.

The reminiscence tune begins with the ever-awaited intro and recap track “The 1975.” The song, says Matty Healy, “is still our status update”, a four-minute account of the state of the world as the lead singer perceives and experiences it. In this album’s version of the track, Healy sympathizes with the teenagers in our present world, singing “I’m sorry if you live and you’re seventeen” and mocks himself, calling himself out for ” makin’ an aesthetic not to do well.

The album’s first single, “Part of The Band,” is a perfect glimpse into the band’s new era, one in which Healy isn’t afraid to say it like he sees it. He not only tells the stories of the world’s soymilk drinkers and tote bag carriers, but shows deep introspection on his own personality. He boldly alludes to the “grinding of his teeth” from his former heroin addiction and concludes the song by wondering if he’s “just a skinny, average, post-Coke guy calling out his imaginary ego?” For someone who “always degrades the sincerity” of his words, it’s refreshing to see this side of Healy – confessional and critical not only of society as a whole, but of himself, above all.

The next two tracks, “Oh Caroline” and “I’m In Love With You”, blend seamlessly into each other and are both on their way to becoming fan favorites (if not already). The stories in both aren’t particularly groundbreaking — it’s just that Healy is in love — but the standout part is its lack of pretension. He just says what he feels – no post-modernism, no existentialism – purely love and some songs that will surely unite touring crowds.

My favorite, “About You”, musically resembles one of The 1975’s most beloved songs, “Robbers”, and therefore serves as a continuation of that story. Additionally, the opening lyrics “I know a place” transport listeners to a track titled “The Birthday Party” from the “Notes” era, as Healy begins the track the same way. Overall, the song evokes an all-consuming nostalgia that transports listeners, especially us longtime fans, back to 2013, the era of Tumblr and Doc Martens.

Overall, “Being Funny in A Foreign Language” lives up to expectations and gives fans planning to attend their next tour a lot to look forward to. While nothing can ever surpass the masterpiece that is the band’s self-titled album, the new record exemplifies Healy’s healing: he is indeed capable of introspection and empathy. And, of course, the album further proves that anything produced by Jack Antonoff is nothing short of perfection.


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A vibrant throwback to 80s fashion at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs and other must-see museum exhibitions in Paris https://willtoexist.com/a-vibrant-throwback-to-80s-fashion-at-the-musee-des-arts-decoratifs-and-other-must-see-museum-exhibitions-in-paris/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://willtoexist.com/a-vibrant-throwback-to-80s-fashion-at-the-musee-des-arts-decoratifs-and-other-must-see-museum-exhibitions-in-paris/ October in Paris marks a shift in focus from fashion to art. This is when the city’s major institutions unveil their flagship exhibitions, while independent galleries often present their rising stars. Usually, October is also when dealers, collectors and adjacent art people arrive at Fiac, one of the world’s leading contemporary art fairs, which this […]]]>

October in Paris marks a shift in focus from fashion to art. This is when the city’s major institutions unveil their flagship exhibitions, while independent galleries often present their rising stars. Usually, October is also when dealers, collectors and adjacent art people arrive at Fiac, one of the world’s leading contemporary art fairs, which this year has been replaced by Paris+ by Art Basel. – a move that, beyond the specifics, looks like a reshuffling of designers and fashion houses.

For all the fairs, installations and parties that will ensure the next few days are as jam-packed as any fashion week, there are several new museum exhibits exploring style, society and visual culture. There is a vibrant throwback to 80s fashion, design and graphic art at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs. There is escape and luster in Yves Saint Laurent Museum, which features the creator’s obsession with gold. There’s a timeless beauty mixed with existentialism at the Louvre, which has mounted an extensive survey of the genre of still life and how objects communicate. There are Alice Neel’s portraits of ordinary people – and the social commentary they embody – at the Center Pompidou. And in the Musée de l’Orangerie there are the scintillating prints of Mickalene Thomas de Giverny which complete the juxtaposition of Claude Monet and Joan Mitchell at the Louis Vuitton Foundation.

At least two of these shows were originally scheduled for 2020, but prolonged Covid shutdowns and uncertainty of reopenings have made it difficult to coordinate slots and loans. Now just like this season Paris Fashion Weekk felt like a real return to the energy of the Before Times, the scale of the exhibitions – and the crowds that attend them – is palpable.

“Paris is living such a great moment. It’s very refreshing to be in the context of others again through art,” Thomas observed during a spontaneous conversation on the street after I recognized her at the pharmacy and introduced myself. . We talked about his latest series (more below) and how there’s endless things to take in this week.

In many ways, museum exhibitions are the anti-art fair experience: they last longer; nothing can be bought; and when done well, they bring forth a perspective that gives the works included greater depth. With this non-exhaustive selection, familiar ideas and themes resurface, either through greater distance and reflection, or because the evolution of our lifestyles encourages a revised and more relevant reading. These are worthy detours from the art fair circuit – and for anyone visiting Paris in the coming months.

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10 Most Pretentious Movies Redditors Have Ever Seen https://willtoexist.com/10-most-pretentious-movies-redditors-have-ever-seen/ Thu, 13 Oct 2022 23:41:00 +0000 https://willtoexist.com/10-most-pretentious-movies-redditors-have-ever-seen/ 2021 Don’t look up received a mixed response over its unique and transparent premise revolving around global warming and climate change. Some thought the concept was a necessary talking point that needed to receive more attention in today’s society, but others found the film rather pretentious in its delivery. Pretentiousness in a movie isn’t necessarily […]]]>

2021 Don’t look up received a mixed response over its unique and transparent premise revolving around global warming and climate change. Some thought the concept was a necessary talking point that needed to receive more attention in today’s society, but others found the film rather pretentious in its delivery.


Pretentiousness in a movie isn’t necessarily an indicator of quality, but rather that the story was driven more by ego than ethos. Reddit users discussed some of the most pretentious movies they’ve ever watched.

VIDEO OF THE DAY

Take That Waltz (2011)

With Seth Rogen and Michelle Williams, 2011 take this waltz revolves around a woman (Williams) falling in love with an aspiring artist (Luke Kirby) despite her happy marriage. Reddit user lordhallucination felt that Williams’ character Margot was presented “as being independent and liberated, but she just came across as ad*uche”.

RELATED: 10 Musicians Make Their Leading Debuts In A Movie Like Don’t Worry Darling

Margot was the singular source of the film’s claim. He is a character who only seeks his own interests, without worrying about the ramifications of his actions. In the end, Margot suffered a backfire when her new reality looks a lot like her old life.

God’s Not Dead (2014)A promotional photo for God's Not Dead (2014)

Religion-focused productions (especially Christian media) can often be controversial, as is the case with the 2014 film god is not dead. While the film spawned a Christian film franchise, Reddit user RedThorneGamerSB complaints god is not dead “think it’s smart but it’s really f**ck*ng stupid”.

What makes the film pretentious is that while there are teachings and findings to validate the presence of man upstairs, the belief of one who thinks God exists is purely subjective. god is not dead missed an opportunity to bring some logic to this timeless debate, instead using formulaic responses as shock value.

mother! (2017)Jennifer Lawrence as a mom!  (2017)

Hope 2017 mother! being one of director Darren Aronofsky’s highest ranked films on Metacritic, its positive response has been lukewarm at best. Moviegoers felt the film was a vanity project for Aronofsky and his then-girlfriend, Jennifer Lawrence, with what Reddit user thinking that “it all felt like a giant ego blow to his artistic genius”.

Although visually beautiful, mother! is pretentious in expecting its audience to understand the story rather than providing extensive depth. Incidentally, the film’s psychological and horror themes were seen as overdone when they could have had a more subtle yet impactful portrayal.

Malcolm and Mary (2021)Zendaya and John David Washington in Malcolm & Marie (2021)

The whole world was affected when the Covid-19 pandemic hit in 2020, with the film industry recording exorbitant losses. Reddit user NewZookeepergame4160 think “Malcolm & Marie”, the first Hollywood film to be made during the pandemic, is a rather pretentious film.

RELATED: 10 Biggest Needle Drops In Movies, According To Reddit

John David Washington and Zendaya carried the film with their fervent chemistry and fantastic performances. However, this was not enough, as the pretentious element of Malcolm and MarieThe simple premise was in the dialogue. Endless monologues, in addition to a lack of coherence around its themes, caused the film to suffer.

Eat, Pray, Love (2010)Julia Roberts in Eat Pray Love (2010)

Many Oscar-winning actors suffered from the Oscar curse, which Julia Roberts broke for herself. After starring in a string of flops, the actress made her comeback with the 2010s Eat Pray Lovea film adapted from Elizabeth Gilbert’s 2006 memoir of the same title. PreviousTea9210 call the movie”In nature” for middle-aged women.

The claim of Eat Pray Love lies in what sets it apart, which is its setting, focusing on sites rather than history. When the film reflects on spirituality, it felt more contrived when it could have been more authentic.

Mr. Nobody (2009)Jared Leto in Mr. Nobody (2009)

Jared Leto has proven himself to be a very exploratory actor with the unique roles and movies he takes on. One of those movies would be the sci-fi drama Mr Nobody, but not everyone joined the following called movies. Reddit user dougflooty2 believes that while Jared Leto has played many pompous roles, “this one is undoubtedly the most egregious”.

RELATED: 10 Best Movies That Blow Your Mind On First Watch, According To Reddit

Which makes Mr Nobody pretentious in its brilliance is that it’s a movie that pretends to be something it isn’t without active efforts. Leto’s performance as Nemo Nobody was effective, but the character himself failed to connect with the audience.

Principle (2020)John David Washington in Tenet (2020)

Another film that suffered from the Covid-19 pandemic was that of the 2020s Principle. The sci-fi/spy action flick marked Christopher Nolan’s cinematic comeback after 2017 Dunkirk. PrincipleThe story of was seen as turbulent by fans and critics alike, with the Reddit user St0lf having “no idea what they were trying to say, but they were definitely trying.”

Christopher Nolan prides himself on his beautifully intricate and innovative works. Principle was praised for its aesthetics and game play, but a muddled delivery greatly hindered what could have been an even more epic run. The premise was shrouded in too many paradoxes for the audience to understand clearly.

Titanic (1997)Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet in Titanic (1997)

by James Cameron Titanic was the highest-grossing film of all time for 12 years, renowned for its visual effects and poignant love story. Alas, there are still some who were not charmed by the film. Reddit user MissScarlettSommer felt that the character of deep-sea explorer Brock Lovett (Bill Paxton) is “maximum pretension and destroys the whole flow of the film”.

Many believe the character was Cameron’s self-insertion due to his strong interest in aquatic exploration. Since the focus was on romance and elements of epic disaster, the blatant historical inaccuracy also created cracks in Titanicthe foundation.

I Heart Huckabees (2004)A poster for I Heart Huckabees (2004)

David O. Russell is a rather experimental filmmaker, seen with the two highly anticipated crime comedies of 2022 amsterdam and 2004 I Heart Huckabees. The dark comedy indie flick is a 6° split between multiple characters, centered on Huckabees, a department store conglomerate. Despite its peculiar premise, this Reddit user offers “I love the Huckabees” like a pretentious movie.

The film’s focus on existentialism and overindulgence didn’t have the impact it should have on moviegoers. On the contrary, since the themes and the story of I Heart Huckabees were so complicated that it was very easy to go over the viewer’s head while watching.

Bedroom

Tommy Wiseau’s directorial debut is pretentious for having Wiseau as both writer and leading man. The 2003 film was widely considered one of the worst films ever made. In his absolute grimace, Redditor dachillees believes that the pretentiousness “is what makes it so amazing”.

Nevertheless, there is a treasure in this so-called “dustbin”, with Bedroom be a good-bad movie. Wiseau co-star Greg Sestero released a behind-the-scenes memoir titled The Disaster Artist in 2013 for the film of the same name with James and Dave Franco released in 2017.

NEXT: 10 Most Iconic Film Scores Of The Last Decade

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